Dictators Democracy And American Public Culture

Dictators  Democracy  and American Public Culture PDF
Author: Benjamin L. Alpers
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807861227
Size: 14.18 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 416
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Focusing on portrayals of Mussolini's Italy, Hitler's Germany, and Stalin's Russia in U.S. films, magazine and newspaper articles, books, plays, speeches, and other texts, Benjamin Alpers traces changing American understandings of dictatorship from the late 1920s through the early years of the Cold War. During the early 1930s, most Americans' conception of dictatorship focused on the dictator. Whether viewed as heroic or horrific, the dictator was represented as a figure of great, masculine power and effectiveness. As the Great Depression gripped the United States, a few people--including conservative members of the press and some Hollywood filmmakers--even dared to suggest that dictatorship might be the answer to America's social problems. In the late 1930s, American explanations of dictatorship shifted focus from individual leaders to the movements that empowered them. Totalitarianism became the image against which a view of democracy emphasizing tolerance and pluralism and disparaging mass movements developed. First used to describe dictatorships of both right and left, the term "totalitarianism" fell out of use upon the U.S. entry into World War II. With the war's end and the collapse of the U.S.-Soviet alliance, however, concerns about totalitarianism lay the foundation for the emerging Cold War.

Power And Time

Power and Time PDF
Author: Dan Edelstein
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022670601X
Size: 29.86 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 464
View: 2396

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Time is the backdrop of historical inquiry, yet it is much more than a featureless setting for events. Different temporalities interact dynamically; sometimes they coexist tensely, sometimes they clash violently. In this innovative volume, editors Dan Edelstein, Stefanos Geroulanos, and Natasha Wheatley challenge how we interpret history by focusing on the nexus of two concepts—“power” and “time”—as they manifest in a wide variety of case studies. Analyzing history, culture, politics, technology, law, art, and science, this engaging book shows how power is constituted through the shaping of temporal regimes in historically specific ways. Power and Time includes seventeen essays on human rights; sovereignty; Islamic, European, Chinese, and Indian history; slavery; capitalism; revolution; the Supreme Court; the Anthropocene; and even the Manson Family. Power and Time will be an agenda-setting volume, highlighting the work of some of the world’s most respected and original contemporary historians and posing fundamental questions for the craft of history.

Free Speech And Unfree News

Free Speech and Unfree News PDF
Author: Sam Lebovic
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674969596
Size: 45.85 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 344
View: 4549

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Does America have a free press? Many who say yes appeal to First Amendment protections against censorship. Sam Lebovic shows that free speech, on its own, is not sufficient to produce a free press and helps us understand the crises that beset the press amid media consolidation, a secretive national security state, and the daily newspaper’s decline.

Defining Democracy

Defining Democracy PDF
Author: Daniel O. Prosterman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195377737
Size: 17.26 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 276
View: 4916

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Defining Democracy reveals the history of a little-known experiment in urban democracy begun in New York City during the Great Depression and abolished amid the early Cold War. For a decade, New Yorkers utilized a new voting system that produced the most diverse legislatures in the city's history and challenged the American two-party structure. Daniel O. Prosterman examines struggles over electoral reform in New York City to clarify our understanding of democracy's evolution in the United States and the world.

One World Big Screen

One World  Big Screen PDF
Author: M. Todd Bennett
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807837466
Size: 66.71 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 384
View: 5748

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World War II coincided with cinema's golden age. Movies now considered classics were created at a time when all sides in the war were coming to realize the great power of popular films to motivate the masses. Through multinational research, One World, Big Screen reveals how the Grand Alliance--Britain, China, the Soviet Union, and the United States--tapped Hollywood's impressive power to shrink the distance and bridge the differences that separated them. The Allies, M. Todd Bennett shows, strategically manipulated cinema in an effort to promote the idea that the United Nations was a family of nations joined by blood and affection. Bennett revisits Casablanca, Mrs. Miniver, Flying Tigers, and other familiar movies that, he argues, helped win the war and the peace by improving Allied solidarity and transforming the American worldview. Closely analyzing film, diplomatic correspondence, propagandists' logs, and movie studio records found in the United States, the United Kingdom, and the former Soviet Union, Bennett rethinks traditional scholarship on World War II diplomacy by examining the ways that Hollywood and the Allies worked together to prepare for and enact the war effort.

Gertrude Stein And The Essence Of What Happens

Gertrude Stein and the Essence of what Happens PDF
Author: Dana Cairns Watson
Publisher: Vanderbilt University Press
ISBN: 9780826514639
Size: 66.33 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 258
View: 1965

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Watson traces Gertrude Stein's (1874-1946) growing fascination with the cognitive and political ramifications of conversation and how that interest influenced her writing over the course of her career.

Warfare State

Warfare State PDF
Author: James T. Sparrow
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199831637
Size: 45.73 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 344
View: 7495

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Although common wisdom and much scholarship assume that "big government" gained its foothold in the United States under the auspices of the New Deal during the Great Depression, in fact it was the Second World War that accomplished this feat. Indeed, as the federal government mobilized for war it grew tenfold, quickly dwarfing the New Deal's welfare programs. Warfare State shows how the federal government vastly expanded its influence over American society during World War II. Equally important, it looks at how and why Americans adapted to this expansion of authority. Through mass participation in military service, war work, rationing, price control, income taxation, and the war bond program, ordinary Americans learned to live with the warfare state. They accepted these new obligations because the government encouraged all citizens to think of themselves as personally connected to the battle front, linking their every action to the fate of the combat soldier. As they worked for the American Soldier, Americans habituated themselves to the authority of the government. Citizens made their own counter-claims on the state-particularly in the case of industrial workers, women, African Americans, and most of all, the soldiers. Their demands for fuller citizenship offer important insights into the relationship between citizen morale, the uses of patriotism, and the legitimacy of the state in wartime. World War II forged a new bond between citizens, nation, and government. Warfare State tells the story of this dramatic transformation in American life.

Confronting America

Confronting America PDF
Author: Alessandro Brogi
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807877743
Size: 21.30 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 552
View: 1597

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Throughout the Cold War, the United States encountered unexpected challenges from Italy and France, two countries with the strongest, and determinedly most anti-American, Communist Parties in Western Europe. Based primarily on new evidence from communist archives in France and Italy, as well as research archives in the United States, Alessandro Brogi's original study reveals how the United States was forced by political opposition within these two core Western countries to reassess its own anticommunist strategies, its image, and the general meaning of American liberal capitalist culture and ideology. Brogi shows that the resistance to Americanization was a critical test for the French and Italian communists' own legitimacy and existence. Their anti-Americanism was mostly dogmatic and driven by the Soviet Union, but it was also, at crucial times, subtle and ambivalent, nurturing fascination with the American culture of dissent. The staunchly anticommunist United States, Brogi argues, found a successful balance to fighting the communist threat in France and Italy by employing diplomacy and fostering instances of mild dissent in both countries. Ultimately, both the French and Italian communists failed to adapt to the forces of modernization that stemmed both from indigenous factors and from American influence. Confronting America illuminates the political, diplomatic, economic, and cultural conflicts behind the U.S.-communist confrontation.

Acts Of Conscience

Acts of Conscience PDF
Author: Joseph Kip Kosek
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231513054
Size: 42.44 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 376
View: 951

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In response to the massive bloodshed that defined the twentieth century, American religious radicals developed a modern form of nonviolent protest, one that combined Christian principles with new uses of mass media. Greatly influenced by the ideas of Mohandas Gandhi, these "acts of conscience" included sit-ins, boycotts, labor strikes, and conscientious objection to war. Beginning with World War I and ending with the ascendance of Martin Luther King Jr., Joseph Kip Kosek traces the impact of A. J. Muste, Richard Gregg, and other radical Christian pacifists on American democratic theory and practice. These dissenters found little hope in the secular ideologies of Wilsonian Progressivism, revolutionary Marxism, and Cold War liberalism, all of which embraced organized killing at one time or another. The example of Jesus, they believed, demonstrated the immorality and futility of such violence under any circumstance and for any cause. Yet the theories of Christian nonviolence are anything but fixed. For decades, followers have actively reinterpreted the nonviolent tradition, keeping pace with developments in politics, technology, and culture. Tracing the rise of militant nonviolence across a century of industrial conflict, imperialism, racial terror, and international warfare, Kosek recovers radical Christians' remarkable stance against the use of deadly force, even during World War II and other seemingly just causes. His research sheds new light on an interracial and transnational movement that posed a fundamental, and still relevant, challenge to the American political and religious mainstream.

Hastings Law Journal

Hastings Law Journal PDF
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 60.97 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category :
Languages : en
Pages :
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America History And Life

America  History and Life PDF
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 55.53 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Canada
Languages : en
Pages :
View: 5629

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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.